Lady or tiger

Stockton The Lady, or the Tiger Page 1 of 5 More by this Author In the very olden time there lived a semi-barbaric king, whose ideas, though somewhat polished and sharpened by the progressiveness of distant Latin neighbors, were still large, florid, and untrammeled, as became the half of him which was barbaric.

Lady or tiger

It was first published in The Century infirmly establishing the subtle Lady or tiger of the short story to captivate readers.

For teachers and students, enjoy our useful The Lady, or the Tiger? IN THE very olden time, there lived a semi-barbaric king, whose ideas, though somewhat polished and sharpened by the progressiveness of distant Latin neighbors, were still large, florid, and untrammelled, as became the half of him which was barbaric.

He was a man of exuberant fancy, and, withal, of an authority so irresistible that, at his will, he turned his varied fancies into facts. He was greatly given to self-communing; and, when he and himself agreed upon any thing, the thing was done.

When every member of his domestic and political systems moved smoothly in its appointed course, his nature was bland and genial; but whenever there was a little hitch, and some of his orbs got out of their orbits, he was blander and more genial still, for nothing pleased him so much as to make the crooked straight, and crush down uneven places.

Among the borrowed notions by which his barbarism had become semified was that of the public arena, in Lady or tiger, by exhibitions of manly and beastly valor, the minds of his subjects were refined and cultured. But even here the exuberant and barbaric fancy asserted itself.

At a Glance

The arena of the king was built, not to give the people an opportunity of hearing the rhapsodies of dying gladiators, nor to enable them to view the inevitable conclusion of a conflict between religious opinions and hungry jaws, but for purposes far better adapted to widen and develop the mental energies of the people.

This vast amphitheatre, with its encircling galleries, its mysterious vaults, and its unseen passages, was an agent of poetic justice, in which crime was punished. Or virtue rewarded, by the decrees of an impartial and incorruptible chance.

Lady or tiger

When all the people had assembled in the galleries, and the king, surrounded by his court, sat high up on his throne of royal state on one side of the arena, he gave a signal, a door beneath him opened, and the accused subject stepped out into the amphitheatre.

Directly opposite him, on the other side of the enclosed space, were two doors, exactly alike and side by side. It was the duty and the privilege of the person on trial, to walk directly to these doors and open one of them.

He could open either door he pleased: If he opened the one, there came out of it a hungry tiger, the fiercest and most cruel that could be procured, which immediately sprang upon him, and tore him to pieces, as a punishment for his guilt.

The moment that the case of the criminal was thus decided, doleful iron bells were clanged, great wails went up from the hired mourners posted on the outer rim of the arena, and the vast audience, with bowed heads and downcast hearts, wended slowly their homeward way, mourning greatly that one so young and fair, or so old and respected, should have merited so dire a fate.

But, if the accused person opened the other door, there came forth from it a lady, the most suitable to his years and station that his majesty could select among his fair subjects; and to this lady he was immediately married, as a reward of his innocence. It mattered not that he might already possess a wife and family, or that his affections might be engaged upon an object of his own selection: The exercises, as in the other instance, took place immediately, and in the arena.

Then the gay brass bells rang forth their merry peals, the people shouted glad hurrahs, and the innocent man, preceded by children strewing flowers on his path, led his bride to his home.

Its perfect fairness is obvious. The criminal could not know out of which door would come the lady: On some occasions the tiger came out of one door, and on some out of the other.

The decisions of this tribunal were not only fair, they were positively determinate: The institution was a very popular one. When the people gathered together on one of the great trial days, they never knew whether they were to witness a bloody slaughter or a hilarious wedding.The Lady or the Tiger?

Homework Help Questions. Did the tiger come out of the door, or did the lady?

Lady or tiger

Ah, that's the question now, isn't it? It makes the reader wonder, which was the intent of the. The Lady and the Tigers: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Served with the Flying Tigers in Burma and China, May 11, Notice that the respective aftermaths of the accused meeting with either the lady or the tiger are parallel: punishment, bells, and audience response.

This emphasizes the ritualistic and theatrical quality of trial by arena, as do the hired mourners. TigerLady is a small and effective women's self-defense tool. At less than two ounces, TigerLady is easy to carry and will fit in your back pocket, bag, or even your favorite clutch, but keep it in your hand while walking alone.

Live with Flair Self Defense Rechargeable Stun Gun Taser Ring Black by Streetwise Bundled With Police Force Sting Ring Holster and Keeping Safe Booklet - Feel Safe Wherever You Go. The Lady Or The Tiger? In the very olden time there lived a semi-barbaric king, whose ideas, though somewhat polished and sharpened by the progressiveness of distant Latin neighbors, were still large, florid, and untrammeled, as became the .

The Lady or the Tiger? by Frank R. Stockton